Presbyopia an eye condition in which your eye slowly loses the ability to focus quickly on objects that are close. It’s a disorder that affects everyone during the natural aging process.


Causes of presbyopia

When you’re young, the lens in your eye is flexible and relatively elastic. It can change its length or shape with the help of a ring of tiny muscles that surround it. The muscles that surround your eye can easily reshape and adjust your lens to accommodate both close and distant images.

With age, your lens and the muscle fibers surrounding your lens slowly lose flexibility and stiffen. As a result, your lens becomes unable to change shape and constricts to focus on close images. With this hardening of your lens, your eye gradually loses its ability to focus light directly onto your retina.


Symptoms of presbyopia

The most common symptoms of presbyopia occur around age 40 for most people. The symptoms of presbyopia typically involve a gradual deterioration in your ability to read or do work up close.

Common symptoms of presbyopia are:

• having eyestrain or headaches after reading or doing close work

• having difficulty reading small print • having fatigue from doing close work

• needing brighter lighting when reading or doing close work

• needing to hold reading material at an arm’s distance to focus properly on it

• overall problems seeing and focusing on objects that are close to you

• squinting Treatment of Presbyopia


No cure exists for presbyopia. However, there are several treatments available to correct your vision. Depending on your condition and lifestyle, you may be able to choose from corrective lenses, contact lenses, or surgery to correct your vision.


Treatment of presbyopia

No cure exists for presbyopia. However, there are several treatments available to correct your vision. Depending on your condition and lifestyle, you may be able to choose from corrective lenses, contact lenses, or surgery to correct your vision.